Same-sex desire in Victorian religious culture

by Frederick S. Roden

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan in Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, New York

Written in English
Published: Pages: 282 Downloads: 283
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Subjects:

  • Homosexuality -- Religious aspects -- Catholic Church -- History -- 19th century,
  • Homosexuality -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century,
  • Catholic converts -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century,
  • Catholic gays -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 272-279) and index

StatementFrederick S. Roden
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBX1795.H66 R63 2002
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 282 p. ;
Number of Pages282
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17072388M
ISBN 100333986431
LC Control Number2002072317

The designation of “same-sex” and “opposite-sex” are put in parenthesis to address the assumption of a binary gender system in which male and female exist in polarized terms. Western culture has not always adhered to a strict binary. French spy and diplomat Chevalier d’Eon who was born in had very fluid gender expression. Greek love is a term originally used by classicists to describe the primarily homoerotic customs, practices, and attitudes of the ancient was frequently used as a euphemism for homosexuality and phrase is a product of the enormous impact of the reception of classical Greek culture on historical attitudes toward sexuality, and its influence on art and various. [Show full abstract] Victorian Feminism (), Frederick S. Roden's Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture (), Susan Griffin's Anti-Catholicism and Nineteenth-Century Fiction ( Author: Juliet John.   Acceptance of Same-sex Sexuality and Gender Non-conformity. We assessed the participants’ acceptance of same-sex sexuality and gender non-conformity with six scenario-based items adapted from an instrument developed by Horn (). These items were translated from English to Dutch and altered in minor ways to increase their relevance for use Cited by:

With all the heated debates around religion and homosexuality today, it might be hard to see the two as anything but antagonistic. But in this book, Dominic Janes reveals the opposite: Catholic forms of Christianity, he explains, played a key role in the evolution of the culture and visual expression of homosexuality and male same-sex desire in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. He. Bodily Desire, Desired Bodies examines the diverse ways that literary works and paintings can be read as screens onto which new images of masculinity and femininity are cast. Esther Bauer focuses on German and Austrian writers and artists from the s and s —specifically authors Franz Kafka, Vicki Baum, and Thomas Mann, and painters Otto Dix, Christian Schad, and Egon Schiele—who. Victorian Studies, which began publication in , is devoted to the study of English culture of the Victorian includes interdisciplinary articles on comparative literature, social and political history, and the histories of education, philosophy, fine arts, economics, law, and science. Above all else, Arthur and Fred, the two main memoirists of the family, were cagey about sex. Today, we name sexual orientations and gender identities in order to live freely; confession is the Author: Simon Goldhill.

Frederick S. Roden, Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture (Basingstoke: Palgrave, ), ix + pages, hardback, £45 (ISBN 0 1). Literature and Religion in Mid-Victorian.

Same-sex desire in Victorian religious culture by Frederick S. Roden Download PDF EPUB FB2

Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in nineteenth-century definitions of homosexual identity. Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological by:   Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in 19th century definitions Same-sex desire in Victorian religious culture book homosexual identity.

Frederick S. Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological discourses/5(5). Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in nineteenth-century definitions of homosexual identity.

Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological discourses. Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in nineteenth-century definitions of homosexual identity.

Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological discourses. Positing Catholicism as complementary to classical Greece. Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in nineteenth-century definitions of homosexual identity.

Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological discourses/5(5). Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in 19th century definitions of homosexual identity.

Frederick S. Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological discourses. Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in nineteenth-century definitions of homosexual identity.

Moving from Newman and Rossetti, to Hopkins, Wilde, and Michael Field amongst others, Same-Sex Desire claims a new literary history, bringing together gay studies and theology in Victorian literature. Buy Same-sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture by Roden, Frederick S.

Professor (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Homosexual desire is a coded presence in many of his paintings, which in portraying classical myths, usually feature effeminate or androgynous young male nudes.

Same-sex desire in Victorian religious culture. [Frederick S Roden] -- This text examines the role of Christian history in 19th-century definitions of homosexual identity.

Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively. Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture examines the role of Christian history in nineteenth-century definitions of homosexual identity. Roden charts the emergence of the modern homosexual in relation to religious, not exclusively sociological : Frederick S.

Roden is Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut, USA. He is author of Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture and editor of Palgrave Advances: Oscar Wilde Studies, Catholic Figures, Queer Narratives, and Jewish/Christian/Queer: Crossroads and Identities.

The third section of Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture concerns writers of the late nineteenth century. In this concluding portion, I examine the place of homoeroticism in relation to the religious life in quite a different context than in the prior two : Frederick S. Roden. The Book of God: Secularization and Design in the Romantic Era Frederick S.

Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture. Basingstoke: Palgrave Scheinberg, Cynthia. Women's Poetry and Religion in Victorian England: Jewish Identity and Christian Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, Schleiermacher, Friedrich. On Religion. 'O'Malley's impeccably researched Catholicism, Sexual Deviance and the Gothic serves as a valuable reminder of the centrality nonetheless of issues of religious belief to Victorian public and private : Patrick R.

O'Malley. Since then, increasing religious diversity and changing functions of government have raised new questions about what it means to allow the free exercise of religion. In this book, Bette Novit Evans explores the contemporary understandings of this First Amendment guarantee in. Amanda Paxton’s Willful Submission: Sado-Erotics and Heavenly Marriage in Victorian Religious Poetry is one of two books concerned with faith in relation to gender.

The erotic depiction of the soul as bride of the divine, so common in medieval culture, enjoyed a resurgence in nineteenth-century discourses, where, Paxton argues, the language of submission to the divine was often used to Author: Amanda Paxton. But there is plain evidence that the early Victorian family of six to eight or more children was on its way out by from the s couples in all classes were choosing to limit and plan family size 'by a variety of methods within a culture of abstinence'.

Oscar Wilde's relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas has inspired contemporary writers for decades. In his account of love tested to destruction, David Hare presents his powerful interpretation of what may have happened behind closed doors between Wilde and Douglas.

The Judas Kiss lays bare the drama of two critical moments in Wilde's last years: the day he decides to stay in England and face /5(3).

Compare Frederick S. Roden, Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture (New York: Palgrave, ), pp. –04 on Eucharistic imagery as a theme in the poetry of the Roman Catholic convert, Gerard Manley : Dominic Janes. Foucault pointed out that, far from being silenced, sex was spoken everywhere in the 19th century in a wide range of contexts including the law, medicine, religion, education.

Much academic and popular work since has considered the many ways in which Victorians did. Focusing on the representation of same-sex desire in Victorian autobiographical writing, Oliver Buckton offers significant new readings of works by some of the most influential figures in late-nineteenth-century literature and culture.

Combining original research, careful historical analysis, Pages: The study that follows takes as its subject the intersection between secrecy as a narrative strategy deployed in Victorian autobiographical writing, and the emergence of same-sex desire as a particular site, or "subject," of secrecy in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century British culture.

Victorian era, the period between about andcorresponding roughly to the period of Queen Victoria’s reign (–) and characterized by a class-based society, a growing number of people able to vote, a growing state and economy, and Britain’s status as the most powerful empire in the world.

Frederick Roden argues, in Same Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture, that the English Protestants who associated “Romanism” and homosexuality were not simple xenophobes. They were reacting to real features of Catholicism.

Slumming elucidates the histories of a wide range of preoccupations about poverty and urban life, altruism and sexuality that remain central in Anglo-American culture, including the ethics of undercover investigative reporting, the connections between cross-class sympathy and same-sex desire, and the intermingling of the wish to rescue the poor.

Ben Carver (University of Exeter) This post accompanies Ben Carver’s Journal of Victorian Culture article published (). It can be read in full here. My article, ‘‘“A Gleaming and Glorious Star”: Rethinking History in the Plurality-of-Worlds Debate’ looks at how astronomical knowledge reframed debates about history in the.

religious studies, and even less exploring female same-sex desire and Victorian Christianity. An exception to the former generalization is Ellis Hanson's Decadence and Catholicism, which discusses male homosexuality, Aestheticism, and Decadence. That book highlights a particular issue that will be evident in the works evaluated here.

Masculinity and Spirituality in Victorian Culture by Andrew Bradstock,available at Book Depository with free delivery : Andrew Bradstock. Book Description: A bold study on the very epicentre of Victorian ideology: the white, male body. The Victorian Male Body examines some of the main expressions and practices of Victorian masculinity and its embodied physicality.

The white, and frequently middle class, male body was often normalised as the epitome of Victorian values. Frederick S. Roden's 13 research works with 7 citations and reads, including: Gender and Religion in Recent Victorian Studies Publications.

This isn’t to say that acting on same-sex desire was safe in Victorian times: the punishment for sex between men was death untilwhen it. Since his Death in Oscar Wilde has been many things to many people, from a pariah to a postmodern saint.

Frederick Roden, in Same-Sex Desire in Victorian Religious Culture, presents Oscar Wilde as a “queer theologian” by arguing that if “his early Catholicism may be denigrated as ‘aesthetic,’ his later soul-searching is decidedly not.” 1 The case for Wilde as being spiritually.